Posts Tagged ‘ Crowd-Funding ’

Patreon

Patreon_Image

The webcomic “MoonWraith” by Desirée Lee and myself now has a page on Patreon. Please give it a look.

For those of you not familiar with Patreon, it’s basically a crowd-funding site to help artists make a bit of money from their endeavors. “MoonWraith” is a free webcomic. Desirée Lee and I don’t see a penny of return for all the time and effort we put into writing it, or creating the artwork for the series. As such, we take time away from paying work to create something free for our fans. “MoonWraith” is currently being looked at – again – by a producer. This one is looking at it as a possible TV series. Several people have been interested in turning “MoonWraith” into a series, or movie. Thus far, though, no one has put the resources into doing so. Until that happens, “MoonWraith” is bringing us no money. Even if such a film or show happens, as long as the producer and/or network allows the webcomic to continue, we plan to do so.

Fans who help support the “MoonWraith” webcomic via the new Patreon page will be helping us to put food on our table, and clothes on our daughter, and still allow us to devote the time to bringing you fresh “MoonWraith” content each and every Monday.

Scott Harper

www.scottharper.net

Crowd-Funding

In the past, I’ve tried crowd-funding as a source of funding for a few projects. None of those attempts have brought any sort of success whatsoever for me. Yet I see more and more projects being funded that way. I see project creators ranging from those just starting out in film, music, or whatever their chosen profession is, all the way up to well-known celebrities using this method to get the money needed to launch new projects. Obviously, crowd-funding works for some people.

How?

Why?

What makes a crowd-funding campaign successful? What do those for whom this method works do to make people want to throw money at their project? Can anyone tell me? There have been times when I’ve run across projects on crowd-funding sites that have made me think, “Seriously? Someone thinks this is a good enough idea to create?” And that project will have already amassed thousands of dollars! What are those creators doing to make their crowd-funding campaigns work so well? I’d be very appreciative of anyone who could help me create such a successful crowd-funding campaign. Desiree Lee and I have some indie film projects in mind that we would turn to crowd-funding for – if we could get that method to work for us.

Scott Harper

www.scottharper.net

 

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